Humpday Hall of Shame: Terry Stewart Strikes Back

A year and a half after his induction, Terry Stewart is making a return appearance on the Humpday Hall of Shame.  Stewart has a checkered past in corrections, dating back to his time as the Arizona Department of Corrections director from 1995 to 2002 and, most recently, in a questionable deal between Arizona and private prison health care provider Corizon.

Since he left his post as ADOC director, Stewart has made a healthy career in the prison industrial complex.  In 2003, he started his own prison privatization consulting firm, Advanced Correctional Management, and began hawking for-profit private prisons to his own former co-workers as a consultant for companies like MTC (Management and Training Corporation) and Corizon Correctional Healthcare.

In 2004, Stewart was named to the commission tasked with setting up the prison system in Iraq.  An investigation by Senator Charles Schumer of New York turned up what the Department of Justice apparently missed – that in his previous post, Stewart had a “shocking record of tolerating prison abuse.”  It should come as no surprise, then, that the system developed by Stewart and others, such as former MTC chief Lane McCotter, resulted in the horrific Abu Ghraib facility.

Stewart is making his second appearance on the Humpday Hall of Shame because of his involvement in Arizona’s plan to implement privatized health care in all of its prisons.  Stewart now works for Corizon Correctional Healthcare, a company that, as we’ve covered before, has a track record of poor treatment as a result of cutting corners; Corizon has also been implicated in a major lawsuit of a doctor who sexually abused at least 25 patients.  The three-year, $369 million deal appears to have been slipped in after the original contract winner, Wexford, pulled out.  And who do you think is the current ADOC director in all of this?  Charles Ryan – another Humpday inductee, as well as Stewart’s former second-in-command and, by some accounts, protégé.

Arizona's choice to privatize healthcare in its prisons is questions at best, given the industry's "flawed and sometimes lethal" treatment of incarcerated people (according to a yearlong investigation by the New York Times) and state reports showing that privatization doesn't save the state any money.  The last-minute choice to go with Corizon, a company with close ties to Arizona's Department of Corrections, raises even more red flags.  We have to wonder:

Why is Arizona giving $369 million to crooked Corizon? 

Comments

RUMORS ARE FLYING THAT CORIZON IS PULLING OUT JUNE 4, 2013. DOES ANYONE HAVE ANY VALID SOURCES INDICATING THAT THIS MIGHT BE TRUE?