CCA

Nov 27, 2016
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Quartz

The US government is already quietly backing out of its promise to phase out private prisons

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Separately, the election of Donald Trump as president of the US has activists worried that the steps taken by the Obama administration to reduce the population of inmates in private prisons will be quickly rolled back. Trump has said outright that he supports prison privatization, and his plans for cracking down on illegal immigration would be a boon for prison operators: the stock prices of CCA and the Geo Group soared following his election

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“We are actually anticipating that the DOJ decision be quite possibly overturned. Either formally or they would be renewals or re-granting of the full contracts,” said Bethany Carson at Grassroots Leadership, a prison advocacy organization.

What has Carson and her group particularly worried is the president-elect’s promise to introduce mandatory minimums for illegal re-entry convictions after a previous deportation. Illegal entry and re-entry convictions already make up nearly half of federal prosecutions. The convicts are mostly held in thirteen so-called “Criminal Alien Requirement” (CAR) prisons, run by private companies, largely CoreCivic and GEO. Both facilities with which the BOP extended its contracts are CAR prisons.

Carson said that mandatory minimums would send average sentences for re-entry “through the roof,” and would require expanding the private prisons the DOJ said it would close in August.

“Expanding this existing system that federally prosecutes immigrants just for crossing the border to reunite with their families or flee dangerous situations could be one way to quite literally manufacture the so-called criminals he wants to deport,” said Carson. Read more about The US government is already quietly backing out of its promise to phase out private prisons

Oct 17, 2016
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Raw Story

Is this the end of prison for profit in the US?

This past August, the Department of Justice released a statement that it would begin the process of phasing out private prison contracts in federal prisons. According to the Department of Justice, the decision came in response to a declining prison population and acknowledgements that private prisons often have lower safety and security standards.

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Private prison corporations, such as Corrections Corporations of America (CCA) and GEO Group, were struggling in the early 2000s. However, following 9/11, immigration became a national security issue, which led to an increase in funding for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). The growth in ICE following 9/11 led to CCA and GEO Group being awarded lucratvie immigrant detention center contracts. 

These private prison contracts often include a further requirement that the government keep immigrant detention centres full and at times contain a "tiered pricing structure" that provides discounts for those detained in excess of the guaranteed minimum. Private prison companies now control 62 percent of immigration detention beds in the US, according to a report by Grassroots Leadership.

Following the Department of Justice's announcement, the Department of Homeland Security announced that it would evaluate whether it will phase out the use of private immigrant detention centers as well.  Read more about Is this the end of prison for profit in the US?

Oct 11, 2016
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Raw Story

New film exposes dangers of the ‘Treatment Industrial Complex’

A new film exposes the 'treatment industrial complex' that has sprung up following announcements that the Department of Justice will begin to phase out use of private prisons and that the Department of Homeland Security will review its' use of privately operated immigrant detention centers. 

As these announcements caused stock in private prison corporations to drop, companies such as Corrections Corporation of America and GEO Group have begun buying facilities that provide 'community corrections' programs, such as electronic monitoring, prisoner re-entry services, and other alternatives to prison.

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Robert Greenwald’s new film, “Treatment Industrial Complex,” produced by Brave New Films, shows how these companies are profiting off efforts to rehabilitate drug users and the mentally ill who become entangled in the criminal justice system.

These companies can only make money if they ensnare more Americans — and hold them as long as possible, said the film’s executive producer, Bob Libal.

Read more about New film exposes dangers of the ‘Treatment Industrial Complex’
Oct 11, 2016
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The Huffington Post

Bloodsucking TIC (Treatment Industrial Complex): Video Reveals The Ugly Truth Behind the For-Profit Prison Industry’s Embrace Of Treatment, Rehabilitation, And ‘Alternatives’

The past few months  have been hard for private prison corporations. First, the Department of Justice announced they would begin phasing out the use of private prisons. This was followed by the Department of Homeland Security announcing they would re-examine the use of private corporations in running immigrant detention centers. These announcements caused stock in both Community Corrections of America (CCA) and GEO Group, two of the largest private prisons companies, to drop dramatically. However, a new trend suggests that they are not out of business yet. 

We call it the Treatment Industrial Complex, or TIC. Through a combination of acquisitions and mergers and an aggressive marketing campaign, for-profit prison companies are moving to preserve their profits by seeking contracts to provide in-prison medical and mental health care; manage mental hospitals and civil commitment centers; and deliver “community corrections” programs, including prisoner reentry services and “alternatives to incarceration” like electronic monitoring.

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This disgusting trend is brought vividly to life in a new video produced by Brave New Films in which the TIC is portrayed as a hairy, bloodsucking tick that is quite literally a parasite on state and federal efforts to end mass incarceration. The video lays bare how the profit motive is fundamentally at odds with efforts to truly rehabilitate people. Instead, these companies rely on recidivism and expansion of the criminal punishment system.

Executive Director of Grassroots Leadership Bob Libal warns, “Private prison corporations’ very existence is at risk as the federal government and states around the country rethink their mass incarceration policies.” He points out that the companies can only profit through volume — which means ensnaring as many people as possible and holding them for as long as possible.

Read more about Bloodsucking TIC (Treatment Industrial Complex): Video Reveals The Ugly Truth Behind the For-Profit Prison Industry’s Embrace Of Treatment, Rehabilitation, And ‘Alternatives’

EXPOSED: 6 types of abuse reported by women from inside for-profit Laredo detention center, DHS still reviewing ties to private prisons

As the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) investigates its use of private prisons, women currently and formerly detained in two CCA-operated immigrant detention centers in Texas are speaking out against abuses in the facilities. 

Their letters from inside are exposing grossly inadequate medical care and health conditions; unsanitary facilities; sickening food; verbal abuse & harsh, punitive treatment; re-traumatization of survivors of violence; interference with phone conversations. 

Translation: “Just like you want to support us, we too are willing to support ourselves and will not stay quiet about the abuse of our rights that we have been victims of.” Read more about EXPOSED: 6 types of abuse reported by women from inside for-profit Laredo detention center, DHS still reviewing ties to private prisons

Sep 27, 2016
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The Wall Street Journal

Immigrant Detention System Could Be in Line for an Overhaul

A recent Homeland Security Department decision to consider ending the widespread outsourcing of immigrant detention could mean overhauling a $2 billion-a-year system built around private prison contractors that house the majority of immigrant detainees.

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Critics of ICE question why there are so many people in custody when illegal immigration has slowed significantly. “The growth in the private-prison industry has been driven by more enforcement that fills beds, even at a time of relatively low immigration levels,” said Bob Libal, executive director of Grassroots Leadership, an organization that studies for-profit incarceration and favors ending it.

The immigrant-bed quota, which Congress first mandated in 2009, benefits the private-prison industry and promotes detention, Mr. Libal and others say. Read more about Immigrant Detention System Could Be in Line for an Overhaul

Sep 21, 2016
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Fort Worth Weekly

Private Hells

A scathing early-August report by the Office of the Inspector General on the quality-of-inmate-life in private prisons led to a very quick decision by the Department of Justice: Unless a new contract is “substantially reduce[d] in scope in a manner consistent with law,” the Bureau of Prisons must allow its current contracts with private prisons to expire.

The U.S. deputy attorney general said she believes this is just the beginning. In a memo to the acting director of the BOP, Sally Q. Yates wrote, “This is the first step in the process of reducing — and ultimately ending — our use of privately operated prisons.”

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But on Friday, Aug. 25, Jeh Johnson, homeland security secretary, announced that he has ordered “a review of for-profit immigration detention contracts.”

The homeland security review comes as something of a surprise: In an e-mail to me later on that same Friday, ICE spokesperson Carl Rusnok indicated that private prisons would continue to be utilized as part of ICE’s inventory of prisoner housing. It should be noted, he included in his message that “ICE detention is solely for the purpose of either awaiting the resolution of an individual’s immigration case or to carry out a removal order. ICE does not detain for punitive reasons.”

Bob Libal, executive director of Grassroots Leadership, a nonprofit focused on ending the use of private prisons in the United States, scoffed at the notion that ICE prisons are not punitive.

“People stay in ICE facilities for weeks, months, sometimes years,” he told me in response to Rusnok’s comments. “Just because they put pictures on the walls doesn’t mean [the facilities] are not punitive. There are still locks on the doors and guards to keep you from leaving.” Read more about Private Hells

Aug 30, 2016
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El Diario

Encarcelación privatizada: Gobierno federal evalúa poner fin al uso de cárceles privadas para inmigrantes

El anuncio reciente del Departamento de Justicia sobre la eliminación de todo contrato con empresas privadas que manejan cárceles porque que la taza de abuso y violencia contra prisioneros en esos centros es más alta que en cárceles manejadas por el gobierno ha tenido un efecto inmediato.

El Departamento de Inmigración y Aduanas (ICE), señaló que ellos también revisarán sus contratos con empresas privadas para verificar la cantidad de abuso y exigir contabilidad de las corporaciones que se nutren de la encarcelación de tantos latinos en el país, en su mayoría mexicanos. Read more about Encarcelación privatizada: Gobierno federal evalúa poner fin al uso de cárceles privadas para inmigrantes

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