raids

Jan 30, 2016
/
KXAN

Austin community discusses deportation raids

AUSTIN (KXAN) — Immigrants and community members in Austin met Saturday afternoon to learn about deportation raids happening across the country.

Following a string of deportation raids happening in states such as Texas, Georgia, and North Carolina, District 4 Council Member Gregorio Casar and others set up a meeting to help immigrants know what services are available, and for others to learn how they can help with the services.

“I think it’s really important for folks to hear what we’re hearing from the administration about whose being targeted by the raids, for people to know what their rights are if they encounter an immigration officer, and also for them to hear that our police department has committed that they are just going to be acting as police officers and not as immigration officers,” said Casar, “It’s so important for the immigrant community to be trusting of our police and for the police force to work with the immigrant community, and that people have separate in their minds the police force from ICE (Immigrations and Customs Enforcement).”

According to Casar his district has the largest number of immigrants within the City of Austin. He says that they are working on establishing a hotline that people can call if they see an immigration raid in action so that the community can be informed.

Among others hosting the meeting were Grassroots Leadership, the ICE Out Campaign, and the University of Texas Immigration Clinic. [node:read-more:link]

Jan 26, 2016
/
KEYE TV

Immigration activists confront mayor about Austin deportations

On Monday, immigration activists demanded to see Mayor Steve Adler. It happened after a walk out at the Public Safety Council meeting where law enforcement gave the council an update on its policy of arresting illegal immigrants.

The ICE out of Austin group walked up the city hall steps to the mayor's office. They want the mayor to draft a resolution that stops Austin Police from working with ICE. [node:read-more:link]

Jan 26, 2016
/
Austin American-Statesman

Immigration advocates rally at Mayor Adler’s office, demand action

Hilda Ramirez, 28, and her 9-year-old son fled violence in Guatemala and were taken into custody as soon as they crossed the border. They were held at an immigration center southeast of San Antonio for 11 months.

Ramirez and her son now live at a shelter in Austin. She said she is in constant fear they could get deported at any time, especially if a police officer notifies immigration officials.

“I suffered a lot there, I came to ask you for help,” Ramirez told Austin Mayor Steve Adler on Monday.

Ramirez and two dozen members of ICE out of Austin, an immigrant advocacy group, gathered at City Hall and asked Adler to pass a resolution to ban Austin police from communicating with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The group is accusing police officers of asking people about their immigration status and sharing information with federal authorities.

“There’s not a lot related to national immigration policy that is in city’s hands. What’s is in our hands is the conduct of our law enforcement and police,” Adler said. “If there are people in the community not treated well, I want those people to come to me so I can do something about it.”

At Monday’s Public Safety Committee, Police Chief of Staff Brian Manley said Austin is not a sanctuary city but highlighted that his officers are focused on crime fighting rather than asking people about immigration status.

In a letter, the group acknowledged Adler’s support to the immigrant community but highlighted the lack of action from city officials to stop deportation.

“We cannot accept any more delays because inaction on deportations locally means Austin families will continue to be separated,” the letter states. [node:read-more:link]

Jan 26, 2016
/
Telemundo

Activistas piden que autoridades de Austin no colaboren con ICE

Un grupo de activistas de la organización ICE out of Austin/ICE Fuera De Austin se reunió el lunes a las afueras de la oficina del Alcalde Steve Adler para pedir un fin a la colaboración de la policía local con el Servicio de Inmigración y Control de Aduanas o ICE.

“Queremos que él tenga acciones con respecto a esto el solamente tiene que decirle a la policía no vas a cooperar con inmigración”, dijo Carmen Zuvieta, quien junto a otros miembros del grupo pidieron que la oficina del alcalde haga todo en su poder para detener las deportaciones en Austin. “A mi me da miedo por todos los demás es un trauma que llevas no sólo por mí por mis hijos por los demás es dolor adentro”.
Los activistas presionaron a Adler para que desarrolle una resolución y que le ponga una fecha a su aprobación.

“Sólo basta que el haga acciones porque ya promesas ya nos cansamos, ya esperamos”, dijo Zuvieta. [node:read-more:link]

Jan 26, 2016
/
Austin Monitor

Immigrant rights activists confront mayor over deportations

ICE Out of Austin – a group pushing for local law enforcement to no longer cooperate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement to detain or deport undocumented immigrants – arrived outside of Adler’s office shortly before 5:30 p.m., belting out chants in English and Spanish and demanding a meeting with the mayor. Group leader Alejandro Caceres rejected an offer from a mayoral aide to meet with Adler in his office, saying that group members wanted the meeting to be public.

...

Adler responded that he was unsure whether a resolution was “the best way” to offer protections to the community.

“But we’re telling you that it is the best way, actually,” responded Caceres. “We’re telling you that we’re tired of families getting deported, we’re tired of politicians saying we have to be patient.”

“We see you as an ally and a friend, Mayor Adler, but if you’re telling us that you’re not going to put forward a resolution, then you stand with ICE and deportations,” Caceres added. “There is no gray line.” [node:read-more:link]

Jan 22, 2016
/
Austin American-Statesman

Council member, community groups to host event on immigration raids

Austin City Council Member Greg Casar and several community groups will host a “Know  Your Rights” training in response to immigration raids being conducted nationally by the federal government to deport people in the country illegally.

At the training, which will be hosted by Casar, Grassroots Leadership, ICE Out of Austin and the UT Immigration Clinic, attendees will be trained on how to interact with immigration officials and will be educated on what rights they have under the law, a news release from Casar’s office said.

...

When: Saturday, Jan. 30, from 2-3 p.m.

Where: St. John’s Episcopal Church, 11201 Parkfield Drive, Austin, TX 78758 [node:read-more:link]

Jan 15, 2016
/
The Austin Chronicle

Women and Children First: Immigration raids targeting families strike fear in Austin's Latino community

The new year has brought with it a renewed effort to seize and deport undocumented immigrants and refugees. On Jan. 4, Department of Homeland Security Sec­re­ta­ry Jeh Johnson issued a press release announcing, "This past weekend, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) engaged in concerted, nationwide enforcement operations to take into custody and return at a greater rate adults who entered this country illegally with children. This should come as no surprise. I have said publicly for months that individuals who constitute enforcement priorities, including families and unaccompanied children, will be removed." Johnson went on to say that the targets of the operation were "adults and their children who (i) were apprehended after May 1, 2014 crossing the southern border illegally, (ii) have been issued final orders of removal by an immigration court, and (iii) have exhausted appropriate legal remedies, and have no outstanding appeal or claim for asylum or other humanitarian relief under our laws."

...

In Austin, it is unclear whether anyone has been seized as part of the ICE raids. Rumors of raids on Rundberg and Down­town have circulated, but have not been confirmed. Regardless, there are many in the immigrant community who believe they're potential targets. For now, the primary response from immigrant rights advocates has been to organize "Know Your Rights" trainings for the undocumented, which largely consist of warning people not to open the door to ICE agents, as well as planning for families who might be left behind if some members were deported. Workers Defense Project plans to hold trainings every Thursday at 7pm, and City Council Member Greg Casar, whose District 4 has the largest number of undocumented immigrants in the city, said his office has received calls from constituents who are "afraid about the fact that ICE could be knocking on someone's door and taking them away." Casar said that his office is working on gathering information about the raids, including whether ICE has requested the assistance of local law enforcement. Of course, City Council can only do so much about what is a federal policy. "We don't want to give the impression that by City Council resolution, we're going to stop the raids," Casar said. In the spirit of "directing as much of our advocacy as possible toward solving problems," Casar's office plans to partner with Grass­roots Leadership to hold a community meeting, tentatively scheduled for Jan. 30. The meeting will include information on immigrants' rights as well as on other services, including places where those who fear deportation can seek sanctuary.

...

Many observers believe the raids are an attempt by the Obama administration to demonstrate that it can be tough on immigration, even as it pushes for immigration reform. The lawsuit filed by 26 states challenging the constitutionality of Oba­ma's executive action expanding DACA and DAPA is scheduled to be heard by the Supreme Court this year. The raids are "proof that Obama doesn't care about actual immigrant community members," said Grass­roots Leadership Immigration Organ­izer Alejandro Caceres. "We're political pawns." [node:read-more:link]

Jan 11, 2016
/
KVUE

Immigration a complex battleground in 2016 race

Yet raids ordered by the Democratic Obama administration this month have communities on edge yet again, Grassroots Leadership immigration organizer Alejandro Caceres told KVUE Monday.

"You're leaving your house today, but you might not come back. Your kids might not come back to their house today, is anxiety and a fear that is very hard to understand if you've never actually felt it," said Caceres, explaining that unclear rules and inconsistent enforcement have compounded the feeling of helplessness. [node:read-more:link]

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - raids