bureau of prisons

Sep 12, 2017
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Houston Press

Lloyd Doggett Wants to Know What Happened at Beaumont's Federal Prison During Harvey

Following pressure from the ACLU of Texas, the Texas Civil Rights Project, the Prison Justice League and Grassroots Leadership, U.S. Representative Lloyd Doggett is demanding answers from the Bureau of Prisons regarding the treatment of prisoners in the Beaumont facility left without food and water following Hurricane Harvey. “Due to several reports of alarming conditions at the Beaumont facility, I have inquired with the Federal Bureau of Prisons to express my concern and obtain clarification about what actions are being undertaken to protect the well-being of prisoners and staff and to restore the facility to pre-disaster conditions,” Doggett said. The article references Grassroots' press release stating prisoners were ignored despite advance warning of devastating conditions. Read more about Lloyd Doggett Wants to Know What Happened at Beaumont's Federal Prison During Harvey

Aug 22, 2016
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KQED Radio

Federal Government to Phase Out Use of Some Private Prisons

The Obama Administration announced last week that the federal Bureau of Prisons will end its reliance on privately-run, for-profit prisons. The facilities, which the Justice Department calls unsafe and expensive, currently house about 22,000 inmates, almost all of whom are not U.S. citizens. While the move will do little to reduce the nation’s overall prison population — now numbering more than 2.2 million — supporters say it’s a crucial step in bringing about broader criminal justice reforms. We discuss the details of the policy change and the prevalence of private prisons across the United States. Read more about Federal Government to Phase Out Use of Some Private Prisons

Humpday Hall of Shame: Get with the program, feds.

Yesterday, Grassroots Leadership board member Megan Quattlebaum’s piece in the Huffington Post called out the federal government, and specifically the federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP), for seriously slacking on criminal justice reform. Her post, “States Lead - Will the Feds Follow?”, shines a light on the fact that while states across the country are taking steps toward progress, the federal government is shamefully lagging behind.  

One way they have fallen behind is in the treatment of women prisoners. While states like Iowa and Washington are putting the concept of “gender responsive” prison programming into practice, the BOP has closed the only minimum security facility for women in the Northeast, converting it to a prison for men only. As a result, some women were transferred far from their families and communities, making it particularly difficult for children to maintain connections to their incarcerated mothers.

Read more about Humpday Hall of Shame: Get with the program, feds.

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